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Trust and price are biggest obstacle to getting consumers to switch to organic 

New research from Mintel show that price and concerns about authenticity are the biggest obstacles to wider adoption of organic by US consumers.

Just two in five (39 percent) consumers whose food purchases are at least half organic and one in five (21 percent) consumers overall agree that organic foods are worth the extra cost.

In fact, Americans are most likely to say they would purchase more organic foods if they were less expensive (62 percent). Highly skeptical of organic claims, just one quarter (26 percent) of consumers say they trust organic food labels, while a mere 13 percent agree that organic foods are highly regulated. For many, brand name outweighs an organic label as just one in seven (14 percent) consumers agree that an organic claim is more important than a specific brand.

When Americans do buy organic, organic fruits and vegetables are at the top of their grocery lists. The Mintel research shows that half (50 percent) of consumers say they are most likely to purchase organic fresh produce such as fruit and vegetables, compared to other food categories like meats/poultry/seafood (41 percent), juice (39 percent) and dairy/milk/yogurt (38 percent). While three in 10 (29 percent) Americans say they do not typically buy food and drink with an organic or natural claim, these products are finding their place in shopping carts across the country. One third (32 percent) of consumers say half or more of the groceries they buy are organic.

“Our research shows that organic brands appeal to younger consumers, but there is significant effort required to persuade older generations of the value of organic or natural claims”

“The fact that consumers are more likely to seek organic fresh produce items not only speaks to the lack of organic options in certain segments, but also to the notion that organic claims simply resonate in some categories more so than in others. Our research shows that organic brands appeal to younger consumers, but there is significant effort required to persuade older generations of the value of organic or natural claims. This indicates that if organic brands can reassure consumers that organic foods are indeed living up to their claims, whether through on-pack messaging or marketing campaigns, it could be a boon to the category,” said Billy Roberts, senior food and drink Analyst at Mintel.

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About the Author

Jim Manson

Writer & Editor
Jim Manson is editor-in-chief of Diversified Communications UK‘s natural and organic publishing portfolio. He’s written widely on environment and development issues for specialist magazines and national media, including the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Times, and World Bank Urban Age

Articles by Jim Manson

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